The Pilot's Blog

A Day in the Life of a Coffee Picker

To get a coffee bean from the mountains of origin to the inside of your local coffee shop takes a lot of hard work.  A single bean passes through many different hands before it becomes your favorite cup of coffee—and it all starts with the world’s hard-working coffee pickers.

Thanks to our wonderful coffee pickers from across the world, we can provide coffee lovers with some of the best coffee on the planet.  But there’s a lot that goes into brewing a delicious cup of Roasterie coffee…just take a look at what our coffee pickers do every day to make sure you get the taste and warmth you crave…and you may learn a thing or two along the way.

Sunrise—Work Begins

As soon as the sun comes up, work begins.  Coffee pickers meet with other crew members to start the day in the mountainous coffee fields.  Each  picker has a basket to collect the coffee beans.  Some coffee pickers take a bus up to the coffee fields; others walk a few miles to get to their destination.

The Picking Continues

From sunup to sundown the coffee pickers work hard.  Because coffee cherries do not ripen evenly, the coffee pickers have to harvest only the mature bright red coffee cherry as they place them one by one into their basket.  As the coffee pickers work, they mentor their children on the process in case one day they want to own a coffee farm.

Collection Site

When the coffee baskets are full, the workers take them to a collection site where there is truck or trailer to dump their baskets.  Each basket dumped is recorded and at the end of the day the worker is paid for the number of baskets picked and the quality of basket where only red cherries are accepted.  The process becomes piece work—the more baskets picked the more the worker is paid.

Processing

When the truck is full, it goes to the mill where the pulp will be separated from the seed (coffee beans) in a depulping machine.  The coffee beans are then put into large concrete tanks where they will set for eighteen to thirty-six hours.  This process is called fermentation which causes the coffees to become sweeter and brighter. Once this process is completed, the coffee beans go to the drying patio where they are constantly be raked in the sun to dry the coffee. Once dry the coffee goes to a resting warehouse for several weeks before starting its journey to your cup.

From the wild coffee fields to your very own mug—we have a lot thank coffee pickers for!

This entry was posted in 2012, Coffee 101 and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *